Dr. Lorece Edwards

Title: 
Professor
Office Location: 
Portage 211
Phone: 
443-885-3566
Email: 
lorece.edwards@morgan.edu
Education:

DrPH, Public Health (Health Promotion/Disease Prevention), May 2004
Morgan State University School of Public Health and Policy

Dissertation: Women and HIV: Exploring the Relationship between HIV
Medication Adherence and Social Support among African American
Women (Co - Principal Investigator, Jean R. Anderson, M.D. Johns
Hopkins Medical Institutions)

M.H.S., Master of Human Services, May 1999
Lincoln University

Thesis: Teaching as Treatment: Interpersonal Skills for Spousal Abusers

B.A., Human and Social Resources, July 1990
Sojourner-Douglass College

Education:

DrPH, Public Health (Health Promotion/Disease Prevention), May 2004
Morgan State University School of Public Health and Policy

Dissertation: Women and HIV: Exploring the Relationship between HIV
Medication Adherence and Social Support among African American
Women (Co - Principal Investigator, Jean R. Anderson, M.D. Johns
Hopkins Medical Institutions)

M.H.S., Master of Human Services, May 1999
Lincoln University

Thesis: Teaching as Treatment: Interpersonal Skills for Spousal Abusers

B.A., Human and Social Resources, July 1990
Sojourner-Douglass College

Lorece V. Edwards, DrPH, MHS is the Director of the Center for Sexual Health Advancement and Prevention Education (SHAPE) and Professor of Public Health at Morgan State University’s School of Community Health and Policy. Dr. Edwards is known as an authentic public health champion. As a scholar-activist, she has published several peer-reviewed articles. Her research has been presented at international, national, and local conferences and workshops. According to the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Dr. Edwards’ article titled None of Us Will Get Out of Here Alive: The Intersection of Perceived Risk for HIV, Risk Behaviors, and Survival Expectations among African American Emerging Adults has been identified as a seminal scientific manuscript that will allow public health, medical, and education professionals deep insights into the views of one population at severe risk of morbidity and mortality from HIV/AIDS – young African American men. Recently, Dr. Edwards introduced a new theory the was developed from her research and validated by the Center for Predictive Analytics – The Perceived Risk Hierarchy Theory. TM This theory will be included in her first book that will be published by Johns Hopkins Press – SURVIVORNOMICS: TM How Can Youth Survive When They are Constantly Being Demonized. Dr. Edward's research interest/passion includes HIV intervention studies, HIV primary prevention, the role of historical trauma and health outcomes, community trauma and violence, alcohol/substance use, structural and social determinants of health, equity, and social justice.

Edwards, L., Rowel, R., Lindong, I., and Hayman, L. (2020). The National Treasure, A Global Pandemic, and Resilience in Motion. International Journal of Ethnic College Health, (in press).

Edwards, L., Hayman, L., and Rowel, R. The New U.S.A.: The United States Anxiety. The Baltimore Times, June 5, 2020.

Edwards, L. Morgan State University’s Professor Talks about Inner City Youth and Survivornomics.(TM) The Baltimore Times, April 5, 2019.

Edwards, L., Lindong, I, Brown, L. et al,. (2018). The Perceived Risk Hierarchy Theory: TM A New Framework for Understanding Health Risk and Reality Among African American Emerging Adults, The International Journal of Ethnic College Health, (4), 30.

Edwards, L., Lindong, I., Brown, L, Hawkins, A. et al. (2017). None of Us Will Get Out of Here Alive. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 28(2), 49.

Briathwaite, R., and Edwards, L. (2017). The Power of Prevention: Reaching at Risk Emerging Adults to Reduce Substance Use and HIV. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 28(2).

Lindong, I., Edwards, L., Dennis, S., & Fajobi, O. (2017). Similarities and Differences Matter: Considering the Influence of Gender in HIV Prevention Programs for Young Adults in an HBCU. International Journal of Environmental Research, 14(2), 2 – 10.

Edwards, L., Dennis, S., Lindong, I., and Braithwaite, R. (2016). Alcohol and Marijuana Use, Mental Health, and Risk -Taking Behaviors among African American Students. International Journal of Ethnic College Health, 2(1), pp. 27 – 36.

Baptiste-Roberts K, Oranuba E, Werts N, and Edwards LV. (2016). Addressing Health Disparities among Sexual Minorities. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America (44)1.

Littlefield, M., Edwards, L., & Akers, T. (2014). A Campus-Community Partnership to Disseminate Health IT Resources among African Americans, Journal of Social Work Education, 50, 648 - 659.

The Whisk Pilot (women's health: increasing the awareness of science and knowledge) Project: Recognizing Sex and Gender Differences in Women's Health and Wellness was submitted (2013) Global Advances in Health and Medicine (in press).

Edwards, L., Irving, S., Amutah, N., & Sydnor, K. (2012). Am I My Mother's Keeper? Unexpected Sources of Social Support among African American Women Living with HIV/AIDS. Journal of Black Studies, (43)5, 571-595.

Edwards, L., Irving, S., and Hawkins, A. (2011). Till death do us part: Life experiences of married HIV-positive African American Women. Qualitative Report, (16), 5, 1361-1379.
Selected as article notable article of week by TQR

Edwards, L., Hawkins, A., and Sydnor, K. (2010). Community Health Approaches to Mobilizing Partnerships and Service-Learning. CES4Health.

Sydnor, K., Hawkins, A., and Edwards, L. (2009). Expanding Research Opportunities: The Fit between HBCUs and CBPR. Journal of Negros Education, 79(1), 79-86.

Frye, V., Latka, M., Fortin, P., Purcell, D., Edwards, L. et al., (2009). Managing Identity Impacts Associated with Disclosure of HIV Status: A Qualitative Investigation (Inspire), Journal of AIDS, 21:8, pp. 1071 - 1078.

Edwards, L., Yarber, L., and Idowu, B. (2008). An African American Crisis: HIV/AIDS among African American Women. One Healthy Life Newsletter, Issue 16.

Referenced in: Creswell, J. (2007). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing Among Five Traditions, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Mitchell, S., and Edwards, L., et al., (2007). Types of Social Support and their Association with Outcome Goals in Multi-Site Intervention for HIV-Sero-positive Injection Drug Users (Inspire). Journal of AIDS, 46 (S2), pp. S55-S63.

Edwards, L. (2006). Perceived Social Support and HIV Medication Adherence among African American Women. Qualitative Health Research, 16 (5) pp. 679 - 691. Cited by 58 related articles.

Edwards, L. and Anderson, J. (2004). Women and HIV: Exploring the Relationship between Medication Adherence and Perceived Social Support among African American Women Ages 40-49, XV International AIDS Conference. Bangkok, Thailand (Abstract #TuPeD5209).

Edwards, L., Zarba, A., and Paluzzi, P. (2002). Interpersonal Violence and Adherence to HIV/AIDS Medication, Journal for Research on African American Women, 3 (1), pp. 22-30.