Raymond Winbush

Raymond A. Winbush
Title: 
Director, Research Professor
Office Location: 
Montebello, Room 216D
Phone: 
443-885-4800
Email: 
raymond.winbush@morgan.edu

Ray is a research professor and the Director of the Institute for Urban Research. As a scholar and activist, he is known for his systems-thinking approaches to understanding the impact of racism/white supremacy on the global African community. His writings, consultations, and research have been instrumental in understanding developmental stages in Black males, public policy and its connection to compensatory justice, relationships between Black males and females, infusion of African studies into school curricula, and the impact of hip hop culture on the contemporary American landscape.

He has served as a faculty member and administrator at a number of universities including: Oakwood University, Alabama A&M University, Vanderbilt University, and Fisk University. Over the last 40 years, Winbush established numerous projects to raise awareness of America's race relations and their impact upon the lives of Black people. He received grants to further his work from the National Science Foundation, Cleveland Foundation, Job Training Partnership Act of 1982, West African Research Association, Pitney Bowes, Inc., the Ford Motor Company, and the Kellogg Foundation. In 2000, Dr. Winbush helped organize the first international conference of the National Council for Black Studies in Ghana, and in 2002 he aided in establishing the Global Afrikan Congress, the largest pan-African organization in the world.

Dr. Winbush appeared as race relations expert on The Oprah Winfrey Show in 2005. His books, The Warrior Method: A Program for Rearing Healthy Black Boys and Should America Pay? Slavery and The Raging Debate on Reparations were published in 2001 and 2003 respectively. His latest book, Belinda's Petition: A Concise History of Reparations For The Transatlantic Slave Trade (is considered a "prequel" to Should America Pay? Slavery and the Raging Debate on Reparations, and provides an overview of how reparations for the TransAtlantic Slave Trade has been a consistent theme among African people for the past 500 years.

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