Developing a Connected Vehicle Transit Signal Priority System

Project Abstract

The objective of this research effort is to develop an advanced Transit Signal Priority (TSP) system within a connected vehicle (CV) environment. Specifically, the research effort develops a CV-enabled TSP system that provides equitable priority for buses (priority with minimum disruption to surrounding traffic) that is effective for near-side, far-side, and mid-block bus stops. While TSP can generally improve schedule adherence, travel time, and travel time reliability for buses, the system-wide impacts of TSP highly depends on the traffic demand levels and transit stop locations. TSP is more efficient for far-side bus stops compared to near-side bus stops because of the unpredictable dwell times associated with near-side bus stops. The proposed research effort will develop a CV-enabled TSP system using a novel cycle-free Nash Bargaining (NB) optimization approach to improve the overall efficiency of traditional TSP systems. It is expected that the proposed CV-enabled TSP system will further improve the travel time of equipped transit vehicles, while at the same time incur minimum dis-benefits to other vehicles. It is anticipated that the proposed TSP system will improve transit operations and service quality and eventually promote more transit ridership, improve personal mobility, reduce traffic congestion, reduce mobile-source emissions and fuel consumption levels and promote fair transportation access and mobility opportunities for all communities and social groups.

Universities and Sponsoring Organizations Involved

Virginia Tech, Morgan State University

Principal Investigators

Kyoungho Ahn (VT) Email: kahn@vtti.vt.edu
Hesham Rakha (VT) Email: hrakha@vt.edu
Young-Jae Lee (MSU) Email: youngjae.lee@morgan.edu

Funding Sources and Amounts

USDOT: $139,991 (Federal), Virginia Tech: $35,000 (Match), Morgan State University: $53,436 (Match)

Start Date

Nov. 1, 2017

Expected Completion Date

April 30, 2019

Expected Research Outcomes

The proposed research approach will develop a connected TSP system, incorporating the connected vehicle technologies into a TSP system to improve overall efficiency of traditional TSP systems. The previous studies found that traditional TSP systems can reduce transit travel time and intersection delays up to 6% and 23% when compared to non-TSP systems. It is expected that the proposed connected TSP system will further improve the travel time and delay of both transit and passenger vehicles.

Expected Equity Impacts and Benefits of Implementation

The proposed study will improve transit operations and service quality, promote more ridership, improve person mobility, reduce traffic congestion, and reduce emissions and energy consumption. Thus, the proposed research will promote fair transportation access and mobility opportunity for all communities and social groups.

Subject Areas

Connected and Automated Vehicle, Connected Traffic Signal Control, Transit Signal Priority, Microscopic Traffic Simulation, Field Testing