Course Offerings

CEGR.510 Principles of Environmental Engineering I- 3 Credit Hours.

The course covers basic concepts in environmental engineering design including environmental engineering hydrology, hydraulics, and pneumatics; water treatment; and conventional wastewater treatment. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CEGR.511 Principles of Environmental Engineering II - 3 Credit Hours.

A continuation of CEGR.510 and covers advanced wastewater treatment, solid waste management, and air pollution control. Prerequisite: CEGR.510.

CEGR.512 Principles of Environmental Engineering III - 3 Credit Hours.

The course covers basic concepts in environmental engineering design not covered in CEGR 510 and CEGR.511 and includes hazardous waste management and risk assessment, noise pollution and control, and environmental quality modeling (water, ground, and air). Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CEGR.513 Environmental Chemistry and Microbiology - 3 Credit Hours.

Chemical laboratory work includes analyses of turgidity, color, pH, acidity, alkalinity, and hardness, etc.; and instrumental methods using high pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and atomic absorption, etc. The microbiological analyses include uses and functions of the microscope, multiple-tube and membrane filter techniques. The laboratory analyses are covered independently from the lecture. The lecture covers combustion chemistry, chemistry of the anaerobic process, and atmospheric chemistry. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CEGR.514 Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment - 3 Credit Hours.

The course covers strategies and methodologies that have been used to assess the impact of engineering projects. These include technology to assess the impact on air, surface water, and ground water quality, and on land use of transportation facilities, water supply and pollution control facilities, and industrial and community development. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Systems reliability and reliability analysis. Includes measures of reliability, reliability index, correlation coefficient, influence, reliability bounds, Point Estimate Method, Monte Carlo Simulation and others.

CEGR. 613 Physical-Chemical Treatment of Waste and Wastewater I - 3 Credit Hours

This course uses object-oriented programming in conjunction with Visual C++ and MFC (Microsoft Foundation Classes) to solve problems in the physical-chemical treatment of water and wastewater. Coverage includes C++, Visual C++, objects, classes, object-oriented programming and advanced topics in unit operations of the physical-chemical treatment of water and waste water including flow measurements and flow and quality equalization; pumping; screening, settling, and flotation; mixing and flocculation; filtration and aeration, absorption, and stripping.Prerequisite: CEGR 512.

CEGR. 628 Bridge Engineering - 3 Credit Hours

Historical development of the modern highway bridge; materials; loads and the load path; reinforced concrete bridges; slab, T-Beam and box girders; slab-steel beam bridges, non-composite vs. composite sections; design of continuous steel beam bridges; plate girder bridges; prestressed concrete bridges; serviceability; inspection, maintenance and rehabilitation of highway bridges; bridge aesthetics. Prerequisite: Structural Design or equivalent.

CEGR. 630 Finite Element Analysis - 3 Credit Hours

Approximation techniques; Introduction to the Finite Element Method; weighing functions; Galerkin formulation; 1-d and 2-d finite elements; coordinate systems; field problems - irrotational flow, heat transfer; structural and solid mechanics, axial force member, theory of elasticity; linear and quadratic elements, element shape functions; isoparametric elements; Software platform ANSYS 5.3. Prerequisite: Matrix Methods in Structural Analysis or consent of instructor.

CEGR.631 Structural Dynamics - 3 Credit Hours

Free and forced vibrations of damped and undamped, single-degree-of-freedom and multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Langrange's equations; transient and steady-state vibrations; eigenvalue analysis for natural frequencies and normal modes; analysis and stability of structural components (including beams, cables and large systems inshore, offshore, and in space). Time-domain vs. frequency-domain analysis; classical approximate methods, Rayleigh method, Dunkerley's equation, Rayleigh-Ritz Method, Myklestad's Method for beams; introduction to random vibrations. Prerequisite: Matrix Methods in Structural Analysis (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent. Introduction to the Finite Element Method. Prerequisite: Structural Analysis.

CEGR.651 Computer Aided Highway Engineering Design - 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the operational, geometric and hydraulic design of highways to achieve save and efficient vehicle operation under the conditions of uninterrupted flow.

CEGR.655 Traffic Engineering I - 3 Credits Hours.

The principals of traffic engineering involving the analysis, planning and design of loads, streets and highways, and their related networks. Coverage includes the dynamics of traffic flows, traffic studies, and data collection; capacity analysis of free ways and arteries; the analysis and design of traffic control systems, including signalized and unsignalized intersections.

CEGR.656 Transportation Models and Simulation Analysis I - 3 Credit Hours.

The theory, development and application of modelling systems commonly used in planning, engineering and operational analysis of transportation systems. The application and calibration of an existing transportation modeling system.

CEGR.657 Advanced Topics in Traffic Engineering - 3 Credit Hours

Theory, analysis and design of coordinated traffic signal systems, traffic information systems and traffic management emphasizing area wide optimization, intermodal coordination and incident management.

CEGR.661 Airport Planning and Engineering - 3 Credits Hours

The planning and design of airports and their supportive infrastructural systems. The operational analysis of airports and the environmental considerations in their location, design, expansion, and operation.

CEGR.663 Readings in Environmental Engineering - 3 Credit Hours

This course is required to prepare students in doctoral dissertation. Selected topics from the current literature will include water and waster, air pollution, solid waste, hazardous wastes, ground water hydrology, hydraulics, etc. Prerequisites: Approval of instructor.

CEGR.665 Random Vibrations and Nonlinear Dynamics - 3 Credits Hours

Review of linear systems-nonlinear systems-phase plane presentation-stability. Random vibrations, SDOF and MDOF systems- continuous systems.

CEGR. 684 Network Models and Algorithms 3 Credits Hours

An introduction to graphs and networks, their properties and value in systems analysis. Identification and formulation of standard problems, and basic techniques available to solve them. Spanning trees, shortest paths, traveling salesman problem, routing and scheduling, facility location problems, flow problems, covers and matchings. Applications and decision analysis. Emphasis on problem identification, use of computer packages, and the relationship of network properties to solution efforts.

CEGR. 687 Ground Water Hydrology - 3 Credit Hours

Theory of ground water movement, storage exploration, and pumping tests. Design of ground water recovery and recharge systems. Prerequisite: CEGR.510

CEGR. 688 Advanced Mechanics of Solids 3 Credit Hours

Mechanical response of materials, including elastic, plastic and viscoelastic components. Continuum mechanics; kinematics of deformation, analysis of states of stress and strain, conservation of mass, balance of momentum and energy, constitutive equations. Discussion of applications including stress concentrations at defects, metal processing, and composite materials. Prerequisite: CEGR 301 Mechanics of Materials or equivalent course

CEGR. 690 Adaptive Structures - 3 Credits Hours

Behavior of simple structures subject to induced internal deformations. Transduction devices and adaptive physical systems. Response of statically determinate and indeterminate adaptive structures, autonomous and nonautonomous systems. Actuator placement and static shape control problems and some control laws and strategies, active control of vibration, and other applications. Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate Standing.

CEGR.702 Seismic Design - 3 Credit Hours

Seismic design of buildings. Dynamic analysis of multi-degree-of-freedom elastic systems subjected to earthquake motions. Inelastic dynamic response analysis. Seismic building code considerations.

CEGR.703 Geometrically Nonlinear Structural Analysis - 3 Credits Hours

Basic concepts of geometric stiffness matrices. Nonlinear analysis of trusses, plane frames, space frames, and membrane structures. Development of three-dimensional beam-column theory.

CEGR.704 Innovations in Structural Steel Design - 3 Credit Hours

Ductile design of steel structures. Development of material models. Concepts of plastic analysis Systematic methods and applications of plastic analysis. Design of ductile braced frames and ductile moment-resisting frames. New building code considerations. Prerequisite: CEGR 452 Design of Steel Structures or equivalent.

CEGR.705 Mechanics of Composite Materials - 3 Credit Hours

Basic mechanics of composite materials. Stress-Strain relationship of orthotropic materials. Introduction to micromechanics. Classical lamination theory. Mechanical behavior of fibre- reinforced composite materials. Damage and failure criteria.

CEGR.709 Wave Propagation in Elastic Media - 3 Credits

Mechanical wave propagation in bounded and unbounded media. Wave reflection and transmission at interfaces and boundaries. stress waves. Additional topics of mutual interest to students and instructor.

CEGR.725 Aquifer Mechanics- 3 Credit Hours

Emphasis on mechanical characteristics of pore flow and skeleton matrix within an aquifer system; motion of pore flow and aquifers, including vertical and horizontal movement of aquifers; interaction between pore flow and skeleton matrix of sedimentary material. Solving Environmental problems related to land subsidence and fissures due to ground fluid (gas, oil and water). Prerequisite: Soil Mechanics, Advanced Hydrology or Hydrodynamics of Groundwater, Partial Differential Equations.

CEGR.726 Geosynthetics - 3 Credit Hours

Emphasis on applied theoretical study of geosynthetics including properties of geosynthetical material (i.e., strength, durability, creeping, etc) and applications to engineering including design of landfill, stabilization of slope, drainage systems, retaining walls, etc. Prerequisites:Soil Mechanics and Surface Water Hydrology.

CEGR. 730 Constitutive Laws in Geomechanics - 3 Credit Hours

Fundamental concepts of stress and strain tensors, criterion of failures for geomaterials. Theory of elasticity, viscosity, and plasticity, and their combinations such as elasto-viscous, elasto-plastic models in geomechanics for clay and sand soils. Discussion of classic models in geomechanics and their applications to engineering. Prerequisites: Advanced Soil Mechanics, Continuum Mechanics, and Partial Differential Equations.

CEGR.731 Advanced Soil Mechanics I - 3 Credit Hours

Mechanics of seepage and ground water flow. Effect of seepage on stability, uplift, and foundation design. Basic lateral earth pressure relation ships. Stability analysis. Design of breakheads, cofferdams, retaining walls and slopes.

CEGR.737 Continuum Mechanics - 3 Credit Hours

Emphasis on theoretical study of continuum mechanics including introduction to tensor analysis; analysis of stress and strain tensors; motion and deformation; conservation laws; constitutive laws. Applications to porous material or sedimentary material in geomechanics and geotechnical engineering. Prerequisite: Partial Differential Equations, Engineering Mechanics, and Mechanics of Materials.

CEGR. 738 Boundary Element Method in Geomechanics - 3 Credit Hours

Theoretical concepts and principles of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) and applications to Geomechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. Establishment of conceptual, mathematical, numerical, and mechanical models. Time and spatial discretization. Solution of matrix equations and programming in FORTRAN and C. Applications of BEM to geomaterials which exhibit linear and nonlinear elastic, viscous, and elasto-plastic behavior. Applications of BEM to solve 2D and 3D problems in Geotechnical Engineering. Prerequisites: Mechanics of Materials, Soil Mechanics, Partial Differential Equations, Numerical Analysis, and Programming in FORTRAN or C.

CEGR.739 Discrete Element Method in Geomechanics - 3 Credit Hours

Advanced concepts, principles, programming, and applications of the Discrete Element Method (DEM) in Geomechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. Parameter and determination. Contacting laws and constitutive models. Modeling of rigid block and granular materials. Modeling of deformable block and granular materials. Establishment of conceptual, physical, numerical, and mathematical models. Discretization in space and time. Programming for computation and user friendly interfaces in Visual Basic. Applications of the DEM in solving engineering problems. Prerequisites: Engineering Mechanics, Soil Mechanics, and programming in FORTRAN or C.

CEGR.740 Special Topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) - 3 Credit Hours

Advanced concepts, principles, and applications of GIS are presented and illustrated. Project design, data acquisition, management, analyses, and display/product generation will be emphasized. Applications of GIS methodologies in real world problems from various disciplines will also be presented. Student will be required to complete a GIS project as the final exam grade for the course. ESRI's ARCINFO and Arc View will form the basic GIS software for the course. Prerequisites: Basic courses in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing or permission of the instructor.

CEGR.741 Special Course in Remote Sensing (RS) - 3 Credits Hours

Advanced concepts, principles, and applications of RS are presented and illustrated. Project design, data acquisition, management, analyses, and display/product generation will be emphasized. Applications of RS methodologies in real world problems from various disciplines will also be presented. Student will be required to compete a RS project as a final exam grade for the course. ENVI and ERDAS will form the basic GIS software for the course. Prerequisites: Basic courses in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing or permission of the instructor.

CEGR.743 Finite Element Method in Geomechanics - 3 Credit Hours

Theoretical concepts and principles of the Finite Element Method (FEM) as well as applications to Geomechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. Establishment of conceptual, mathematical, numerical, and mechanical models. Time and spatial discretization. Solution of matrix equations and programming in FORTRAN and C. Applications of FEM to geomaterials which exhibit linear and nonlinear elastic, viscous, and elasto-plastic behavior. Applications of FEM to solve 2D and 3D problems in Geotechnical Engineering. Prerequisites: Mechanics of Materials, Soil Mechanics, Partial Differential Equations, Numerical Analysis, and Programming in FORTRAN or C.

CEGR.746 Advanced Soil Dynamics - 3 Credit Hours

Emphasis on theoretical and applied study in soil dynamics including soil stress-strain relations, strength and failure under dynamic loading, loading rate effect, small and larger deformation under repeated loading , propagation of stress wave in soils. Investigation of soil dynamic parameters through Lab and field. Solving problems in engineering such as sand liquefaction due to earthquake, foundation stability analysis under vibration, wave propagation because of pile driving or earthquake, etc. Prerequisite: Soil Dynamics, Partial Differential Equations, Mechanics of Materials

CEGR.788 Seminar I - 1 Credit; 3 Hours

This is the first part of an advanced seminar course taken during the first two semesters of the Master of Engineering program in which students from different engineering disciplines (Civil, Electrical, and Industrial Engineering) work together to identify and solve problems.

CEGR.789 Seminar II - 1 Credit; 3 Hours

This is the second part of an advanced seminar course taken during the first two semesters of the Master of Engineering program in which students from different engineering disciplines (Civil, Electrical, and Industrial Engineering) work together to identify and solve problems.

CEGR.790 Research in Civil Engineering - 3 Credit Hours

This course provides for independent inquiry into any civil engineering-related topic. Through a search of the appropriate literature, the student can gain depth in a particular subject area or breadth in other fields related to civil engineering. At the commencement of the semester, student must submit an outline of the proposed work for approval of the supervising faculty member and the chair of the department. A written report is required.

CEGR.797 Project Guidance - 1 Credit Hour

Project guidance provides a student who has not completed his project in the assigned semester a mechanism for continuing his work under faculty supervision.

CEGR.798 Project Report I 2 Credits
CEGR.799 Project Report II 2 Credits
CEGR.997 Dissertation Guidance 3 Credits

Dissertation guidance provides a student who has not completed his dissertation in the assigned semester, a mechanism for continuing his work under faculty supervision.

CEGR.998 Dissertation 12 Credits.