Architecture Curriculum

The Master of Architecture program offers evening courses to accommodate the needs of  students who work or intern in the architecture profession. The program leading to the Master of  Architecture consists of 90 total semester credits (75 core credits and 15 elective credits) of  coursework, normally requiring a minimum of three years full-time graduate study to complete.

Click here to download the Master of Architecture Recommended Curriculum Sequence

FIRST YEAR (FALL SEMESTER)
ARCH 501 Transitions in Architecture: Theory and Research 3
ARCH 510 Environmental Design 6
ENST 512 Graphics Workshop 3
ARCH 513 Technology I (Statics and Strength of Materials) 3
15
FIRST YEAR (SPRING SEMESTER)          
ARCH 520 Architectural Design Studio II 6
ARCH 511 Built Environment History I 3
ARCH 522 Architectural Technology II (Building Systems-Structures) 3
ARCH 533 Architectural Technology V (Building Materials) 3
15
SECOND YEAR (FALL SEMESTER)
ARCH 530  Architectural Design Studio III 6
ARCH 521 Built Environment History II 3
ARCH 532 Architectural Technology IV (Building Systems-Structures) 3
ARCH 523 Architectural Technology III (Environmental Controls) 3
15
SECOND YEAR (SPRING SEMESTER)          
ARCH 540 Architectural Design Studio IV 6
ARCH 5XX Advanced History and Theory Elective (Approved Elective 1) 3
ARCH 541 Architectural Technology VI (The Integrated, Intelligent Detail)    3
URBD 511 Urban Design 3
15
THIRD YEAR (FALL SEMESTER)
ARCH 550 Architectural Design Studio V 6
ARCH 771 Architectural Thesis Seminar 3
XXX Approved Elective 2 3
XXX Approved Elective 3 3
15
THIRD YEAR (SPRING SEMESTER)
ARCH 799 Architectural Design Studio VI 6
ARCH 561 Architectural Practive, Law, and Management 3
XXX Approved Elective 4 3
XXX Approved Elective 5 3
15
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS 90

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ARCH 501 Transitions in Architecture: Theory and Research
Three Hours; 3 Credits

ARCH 510 Environmental Design I
Twelve Hours: 6 Credits
This studio is an introduction to the vocabulary and tools of the built environment professional through an interdisciplinary studio for all first year architecture students. The course is designed to move students from an initial view of their personal values and environment to a more expansive view of values and environments of  others. Students will also be introduced to contemporary trends of the built environment professions, basic problem solving and visual communication skills. Using Baltimore as a laboratory, students will analyze through drawings, models and diagrams, the interrelated complexities of forms, spaces and structures of the city. Prerequisite: Admission to program.



ARCH 511 Built Environment History I

Three Hours: 3 Credits

An introduction to the historic foundations of built form, including settlement patterns and indigenous building types.  Beginning with Egyptian architecture and continuing to the philosophical start of the Renaissance, this course is a foundation in the history and theory of architecture that develops an understanding of the close relationship between social forces and the forms of architecture. Prerequisite: Admission to program.



ARCH 513 Technology I (Statics and Strength of Materials)

Three Hours: 3 Credits

This course is devoted to the development and application of the principles of static mechanics and strength of materials as they relate to the analysis of building structures. Prerequisites of physics and mathematics through college algebra are required. Prerequisite: Admission to program.


ARCH 520 Architectural Design Studio II
Twelve Hours: 6 Credits

The architecture students are introduced to a familiar environmental package of the home and adjacent landscape. The intention of the course is to teach students to design residences and communities based on an understanding of the form and structures of urban home and community prototypes. Emphasis will be placed on developing design criteria through the analysis of conditions, needs, aspirations and resources of the resident's-environment. Attention will be given to the role of the residential neighborhoods in the city by understanding the elements that produce the satisfying urban home and residential community. Prerequisite: ARCH 510.



ARCH 521 Built Environment History II

Three Hours: 3 Credits

Building on the concepts of ARCH 511 Built Environment History I, this course is an introduction to architectural and urban design history from 1500 to 1900, with an emphasis on world architecture and the significance of multicultural architectural traditions. The development of specific built form topologies is studied, including patron residential, religious, civic structures, and urban space. Emphasis will be placed on two specific areas. The first is to identify significant architects, their theories and buildings; the second is to look at how cities evolved, adapting to new uses and styles of habitation. Prerequisite: ARCH 511.



ARCH 522 Architectural Technology II (Building Systems-Structures)

Three Hours: 3 Credits

The purposes of this course are (1) to develop the student's skills and techniques in the design of basic elements of various wood and steel structural systems; (2) to expand their understanding of the principles and characteristics of various structural materials; and (3) to enhance his/her ability to resolve structural problems of cost, durability, space, legal restrictions, time and aesthetics. Prerequisite: ARCH 513.



ARCH 523 Architectural Technology Ill (Environmental Controls)

Three Hours: 3 Credits
The purposes of this course are to expand the students' understanding of the nature and characteristics of various environmental systems as well as to develop their ability to make choices between systems that best resolve the problems of cost, social accommodation, operating efficiency, durability, scheduling, safety, and aesthetics. Prerequisite: ARCH 510.



ARCH 530 Architectural Design Studio III

Twelve Hours: 6 Credits

As a continuing study of an urban neighborhood, students will be introduced to commercial and/or institutional forms and their contexts. Students will explore various issues related to the programming, planning and designing of various types of commercial and institutional establishments. Emphasis will be placed on the requirements, analyzing various environmental concerns, planning considerations and jointly developing design solutions that address architectural and landscape architectural requirements. The course will be organized into a sequence of design problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 520.

ARCH 531 Built Environment History Ill

Three Hours: 3 Credits

This course covers the philosophy of modem architecture since 1910, the building styles and works by masters of modern architecture after World War II, and introduces the graduate student to divergent architectural theories that began with post-modem architecture. Emphasis is placed on individual research projects and presentations by students on a particular theory of architecture or by a particular architect during the contemporary era. Prerequisite: ARCH 521.



ARCH 532 Architectural Technology IV (Building Systems-Structures)
Three Hours: 3 Credits
This course is a continuation of Architectural Technology Ill and is designed to (1) develop students' skills and techniques in the, design of basic elements of various concrete structural systems; (2) expand their understanding of the principles and characteristics of various structural materials; and (3) enhance their ability to resolve structural problems of cost, durability, space, legal restrictions, time and aesthetics. Prerequisite: ARCH 522.



ARCH 533 Architectural Technology V (Building Materials)

Three Hours: 3 Credits

In this course, students learn to evaluate selected sets of building materials. Additionally, students will be required to apply their analytical skills to the selections of materials for a selected project.  Emphasis will be given to the relationship between design and construction. Although the analytical process to be taught can be universally applied in material selections, the focus will be on those materials and techniques commonly used in the Central Atlantic Region of the United States. The principles of specification writing and existing CSI standards are introduced and applied on specific assignments. Prerequisite: ARCH 523.



ARCH 540 Architectural Design Studio IV

Twelve Hours: 6 Credits
  
The intent of this studio is to explore design approaches to multi-use public facilities. Assignments and design problems will require the students to use their experiences in data collection and analysis in developing design approaches for multi-use facilities. Problem statements will be developed in concert with current needs of selected municipalities. Specific emphasis will be placed on having the students develop extensive sets of presentation documents outlining structural, environmental and spatial character of the built form(s) they create. Prerequisite: ARCH 530.



ARCH 541 Architectural Technology VI (Integrated BIM Design Methods)

Three Hours: 3 Credits
 
This course is an introduction to Building Information Modeling (BIM) concepts, with applications to communicating building materials and construction. Emphasis is placed on organizational concepts and methods, and the use of BIM to advance sustainable design through the analysis of materials and building performance. Students will work with the designs of renowned architects, using BIM to represent the works of these designers, and to transform and develop these designs by responding to design theories and sustainability factors introduced by the instructor. The platform software is selected by the instructor, with the expectation that the universal concepts of Building Information Modeling (BIM) learned in this course will translate to a variety of industry platforms for BIM.



ARCH 550 Architectural Design Studio V

Twelve Hours: 6 Credits
            
This studio will deal with larger-scale development in the Baltimore metropolitan region. The projects will address the many facets of urban residential development, including financial, social and environmental concerns. Proposed criteria for development, land use, programming and physical built form will be dealt with on a site-specific basis. It is the intention that the site and the context of the problem force the designer to consider mixed, residential and commercial uses. The quality and standard of physical design synthesis will play a major role in determining the ultimate viability for future development.Prerequisite: ARCH 540. Co-requisite or prerequisite: ARCH 531.



ARCH 561 Architectural Practices, Law and Management

Three Hours: 3 Credits

The objective of this course is to explore the roles, relationships, and legal responsibilities of an architect. The architect's professional interaction with consultants, owners, contractors and the various governmental authorities that regulate the building industry will be discussed. The fundamentals of professional practice and ethics, as well as various management tools will also be explored. Prerequisite: ARCH 540.

ARCH 601 Historic and Cultural Preservation 
Three Hours:  3 Credits

This course provides a broad overview of the history, theory and practice of historic preservation. Topics covered will include a history of preservation at the local, national and international level; local, state and federal laws and regulations, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built and natural environment, the roles of private and non-profit preservationists; and the various occupational opportunities for preservationists.
Prerequisite: None. 

ARCH 602 Historic Periods, Styles, and Movements 
Three Hours: 3 Credits

This course will examine American architecture from the late 18th, 19th and 20th century, not as an insular phenomenon, but as part of a transnational history of architectural periods, styles and movements. While the course focuses on buildings and architectural projects constructed within the national boundaries of the United States of America between 1776 and the present, this focus necessarily also involves a wider historical and geographical scope, including the North Atlantic region as a cultural sphere; the architecture of colonizing powers, especially England; international codes of classical and modernist architecture emanating from Europe; and the architecture of regions eventually conquered by the United States, especially in the southwest. Prerequisite: ARCH 601.

ARCH 603 Historic Materials & Technology 
Three Hours: 3 Credits

This course examines common historical and contemporary building materials and technologies with the intention of understanding their basic properties, the ways they have been transformed into building elements, assemblies and systems, typical causes for their changes over time, and protocols for their conservation. The principal product of the class is a comprehensive and detailed building investigation, known as a Historic Structure Report, on an historic structure.
Prerequisite: ARCH 601.

ARCH 604 Historic Documentation
Three Hours:  3 Credits

This course is an advanced seminar/studio, designed to train students in the Historic American Building Survey (HABS) techniques through supervised reading, fieldwork, and writing. Course work introduces students to the skills needed to conduct research, photograph and document both in written and graphic form. Emphasizing efficiency and accuracy in its consideration of sources, methods and techniques, discussion helps students develop reasonable research questions and carefully evaluate evidence. To test the approaches and sample the sources introduced during the semester, students in the seminar participate in a research project to document a particular historic structure or group of historic structures.
Prerequisite: ENST 601.

ARCH 771 Terminal Project Seminar

Three Hours: 3 Credits
 
The seminar will include discussions of trends in contemporary professional design. The primary intent of this effort is to assist the student's selection of a direction for the final semester terminal thesis. A secondary objective is to compel the student to develop a design program, based on research and evaluation, for his/her terminal design in the final semester. Prerequisite: ARCH 531 and 540.



ARCH 772 Architectural Design Studio VI-Terminal Project

Twelve Hours: 6 Credits

This studio involves the conception, development and design of a comprehensive thesis project programmed in ARCH 799.185. Lectures, seminars and outside assignments as required.  Prerequisite: ARCH 550; Prerequisite or co-requisite ARCH 541 Tech VI.



ARCH 797 Thesis Guidance
Two Hours: 2 Credits

ARCH 799 Thesis Seminar

Three Hours: 3 Credits



ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
ENST 512:  Graphics Workshop
Three Hours: 3 Credits

Graphics Workshop is an interdisciplinary course taken jointly by students in the Architecture and Landscape Architecture programs. The purpose of this course is to develop students' skills and techniques in visual communications, thus allowing them to select and apply the most appropriate means of graphically presenting problems and/or solutions. Students are also exposed to techniques and skills that aid in perceiving forms in three dimensions-a necessary  ingredient for design creativity. Prerequisites: None.  

ENST 605:  Historic and Cultural Preservation Studio
Eight Hours: 6 Credits

This course is a historic preservation studio, with a focus on applied concepts in the practice of historic and cultural preservation across the three environmental design disciplines, architecture, landscape architecture, planning.  Studio projects are a laboratory for applied research in historic preservation, with a focus on cultural resources.  Prerequisites: ENST 601 or permission of instructor or Department Chair. 

ENST 714:  Built Environment Internship I
Hours Vary: 3 Credits

This course is designed to accommodate students involved in various work-study relationships in different agencies and community organizations. Working under the supervision of an office professional, the course will document and evaluate the diverse experiences of the students within the framework of the practice or agency.  The instructor will  determine the number of contact hours for an Internship based on the scope of work to be performed by the student and the number of course hours the student is taking in a given semester.  Prerequisites: Permission of the Department Chair.

ENST 715:  Built Environment Internship II
Hours Vary: 3 Credits 

ENST 738:  Seminars in Built Environment Studies
Three Hours: 3 Credits

This course is designed to examine, in greater depth, particular subject areas of the built environment, i.e., Theories of Architecture, Behavior and the Built Environment, Ecology and Design, Design Theory and Criticism, Culture and Design, Open Space Planning and Design, Photography of the Built Environment. Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor and the respective Department Chair. 

URBAN DESIGN
URBD 511 Principles of Urban Design

Three Hours: 3 Credits

This course introduces students to urban design by analyzing the dynamics that created existing, historic and contemporary urban spatial patterns, and the planning and design theories that have guided ongoing development in the built environment. The urban political economy will be studied as well for its role in fomenting change in the urban landscape. The primary course objective is to prepare students for designing buildings within the urban context, and to design and develop basic urban design concepts. The course is structured as a seminar, with the inclusion of some design studio assignments. The premise for this course is that urban design is the process of directing the growth and conservation of regions, cities, suburbs, communities and neighborhoods. As such, urban design is considerably more than aesthetics; it encompasses social and political endeavors. The task of the urban designer is to create, extend, protect, and/or reinvigorate places that are successful across multiple realms that are simultaneously physical, social, economic, political, aesthetic and even personal and familiar.