Dessa   David

Associate Professor
Ph.D., Graduate Center, City University of New York, 2004

 

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Biography
Prof. Dessa David is an Associate Professor in the Department of Information Science and Systems. Prof. David received a B.S in Computational Mathematics and an M.A. in Computer Science from Brooklyn College @ City University of New York and a M. Phil in Computer Science and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Graduate Center @ City University of New York.


Research Interests

  • Implementation, adoption, and diffusion of information technology
  • Information Systems Strategy
  • Knowledge-based systems and related technologies
  • End user computing

Recent Publications
Radhakrishnan, A., Sridharan, Sri V., Moore, D. D., Davis, S., & David, D. (2011). Applying Confirmatory Factor Analysis Multi-Trait Multi-Method Approach in Supply Chain Management Research. International Journal of Applied Decision Sciences, 4 (2).

Radhakrishnan, A., David, D., Hales, D., & Sridharan, V. Sri (2011). Mapping the Critical Links between Supply Chain Evaluation System and Supply Chain Integration Sustainability: An Empirical Study. International Journal of Strategic Decision Sciences, 2 (1), 44.

David, D., Agboh, D., & Radhakrishnan, A. (2010). Factors Influencing the Adoption of Technologies in Developing Countries: An Empirical Study. Journal of Academy of Business and Economics, 10 (4), 1-14.

Mohapatra, P. & David, D. (2009). A Conceptual Framework for Strategic Alignment of E-Commerce in Retail Firms. Business Research Yearbook, 1, 127-132.

Ngeru, J., David, D., & Hargove, K. (2009). Developing An Enterprise Integration Strategy Using An AHP-Delphi Approach. Journal of Management and Engineering Integration, The, 2 (1), 92-101.

Radhakrishnan, A., Sridharan, S. V., David, D., Davis, S., & Moore, D. D. (2008). Developing and measuring Dimensions of Supply Chain Capabilities. Journal of Academy of Business and Economics, 8 (1), 157-165.

Turner, C., David, D., & Lewis, M. (2008). Just Say Anything and I Will Know Who You Are: A Method to Improve Speaker Recognition. Business Research Yearbook, XV, 257-262.