Omari Jackson, Ph.D.

Title: 
Assistant Professor
Office Location: 
Jenkins Building Room 431
Phone: 
443-885-3852
Email: 
Omari.Jackson@morgan.edu
Education:

Doctor of Philosophy, Sociology (minor in Social Work), Wayne State University (2013)

Master of Arts, Sociology (minor in Social Work), Wayne State University (2011)

Erasmus Student, Department of Crime and Criminal Justice, University of Salford (Manchester, England) (2006)

Bachelor of Arts, Sociology (concentration in Criminology/Inequality), The University of Michigan (2003)

Morgan Mile Collage

Education:

Doctor of Philosophy, Sociology (minor in Social Work), Wayne State University (2013)

Master of Arts, Sociology (minor in Social Work), Wayne State University (2011)

Erasmus Student, Department of Crime and Criminal Justice, University of Salford (Manchester, England) (2006)

Bachelor of Arts, Sociology (concentration in Criminology/Inequality), The University of Michigan (2003)

Morgan Mile Collage

Teaching Interests:
Introduction to Sociology
Social Problems
Urban Sociology
Sociology of Education
Social Inequality and Stratification

Research Interests:
Black Middle Class
Education
Media
Urban Sociology

Dr. Jackson's CV

Biography:
Prior to Dr. Omari Jackson's current appointment, he was Assistant Professor of Sociology at Colby-Sawyer College and Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice at Concordia University. He is an active researcher; publishing in peer reviewed journals and presenting at academic conferences. He is interested in all things black middle class. Accordingly, he has written papers, presented at conferences, and served as an expert sociologist on middle class blacks in television, the role of the black middle class in the Flint Water Crisis, and middle class blacks' education and residential patterns.

Dr. Jackson was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan and is a product of the Detroit Public School system. His father was a blue collar laborer for the automobile industry and his mother was a pink collar laborer for a hospital. He became interested in the black middle class because he saw his class position change as he progressed from primary education to secondary education and eventually post-secondary education. The change was not because his parents' income increased or decreased, rather his peers' family income increased as he changed schools. In grades kindergarten through eighth, he attended the neighborhood school for his zone--Ralph Waldo Emerson and often saw the disparities between his social class and others' social class. Hailing from a two parent household, with a father working in the automotive industry, his family income was much higher than many of his classmates' family income. However, he was not unique; as many children's parents worked for the automobile industry. The difference was many of those households were headed by a single parent; depressing the household income.

For high school, he attended a city-wide magnet school--Lewis Cass Technical High. As a city-wide magnet school, children from all social strata attended the school. Some children's parents were judges, doctors, professors, and the like. Of course, some children's parents were employed in the automotive industry; but some children also came from impoverished backgrounds as well. In high school, Dr. Jackson noticed the privilege of students who came from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. For college, he attended The University of Michigan (UM). Though UM is a public school, it attracts a wealthy population of students. Accordingly, Dr. Jackson's understanding of middle class changed; as he was not wealthy and lacked many of the "middle class" social and cultural experiences of his collegiate peers whose parents attended college.

With the aforementioned life experiences, he started reflecting on social class. Even more, he started to reflect on the difference between a person who makes $90,000 as a blue collar laborer and $90,000 as a college-educated white collar laborer. Why did he attend college, yet many of his peers whose parents were employed in the automotive industry did not attend college? Through his personal reflection, he came up with an answer: the emphasis his parents placed on college and his attendance at a magnet school provided social and cultural capitals that many of his peers lacked. Though this was his personal answer, he had to find statistical significance (right, quantitative folks?!). This led to his interests in middle class blacks as well as urban education.

Dr. Jackson has a wealth of experience working with minorities in higher education, in terms of recruitment, retention, and post-secondary success. He has devoted his lifetime, since the age of 16, to the betterment of the black community and considers Morgan to be his dream job! He conducts diversity trainings and gives lectures on myriad topics surrounding race and social class as well as talks on educational motivation, success, and persistence.

Lastly, but most importantly, he is married to Kanika Nicole Jackson. They have a five year old son who is ACTIVE in every way imaginable.