Aaron Gresson III, Ph.D.

Title: 
Adjunct Lecturer
Office Location: 
Jenkins Building Room 430
Phone: 
443-465-6724
Email: 
Aaron.Gresson@morgan.edu
Education:

Ph.D. Counseling Psychology, Boston College (1985)
Ph.D. Educational Administration/Sociology, The Pennsylvania State University (1976)
M.A. School Psychology, The University of Toronto (1971)
B.A. Sociology (Honours), University of Waterloo (1970)


• Gerontological Society of American Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Geriatric Mental Health, Massachusetts Mental Health Center, Harvard University, 1980 (Boston, MA)


• NIMH Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship in Behavioral Science in Medicine, Hershey Medical Center, The Pennsylvania State University, 1975-77 (Hershey, PA)

Collage Partnerships

Education:

Ph.D. Counseling Psychology, Boston College (1985)
Ph.D. Educational Administration/Sociology, The Pennsylvania State University (1976)
M.A. School Psychology, The University of Toronto (1971)
B.A. Sociology (Honours), University of Waterloo (1970)


• Gerontological Society of American Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Geriatric Mental Health, Massachusetts Mental Health Center, Harvard University, 1980 (Boston, MA)


• NIMH Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship in Behavioral Science in Medicine, Hershey Medical Center, The Pennsylvania State University, 1975-77 (Hershey, PA)

Collage Partnerships

Teaching Background:

I am Professor Emeritus of Education and Human Development at The Pennsylvania State University. I previously taught at Boston University, Brandeis, Colby, Brown, Hershey Medical School, and the State University of New York. After retirement, I returned to Baltimore to pursue two enduring interests: community mental health and teaching at an HBCU. I am currently a psychotherapist in Baltimore, where I specialize with African American youth and males of different races-ethnicities. Returning to Morgan's Sociology Department after a 35 years absence is the fulfillment of my desire to be an active part of the HBCU community.

Courses Taught (Selected):

Introduction to Sociology; Collective Behavior and Action; Sociological Theory; Sociology of Oppression; Identities and Interaction; Sociological Thought and African Americans; Sociology of Education; Race and Ethnic Relations

Research Interests:

Race & Oppression in the Diaspora; Cultural Theory and Symbolic Representation; Social Theory; Gender Studies; Clinical Sociology and Identities (Betrayals); Sociology of Communication; Critical Pedagogy and Education


Publications (Selected):

Dialectics of BetrayalTrained in both sociology and psychology, my research has been both multi- and interdisciplinary in approach and scope. I have published several books, chapter, and articles dealing with the above-mentioned research interests. Among these are The Recovery of Race in America (Minnesota, 1995), which was named "Best New Book in Communications" by the Eastern Communications Association; and The Dialectics of Betrayal: Sacrifice, Violation, and the Oppressed (New York: Ablex, 1982), which was partly completed during my tenure at Morgan in 1979. In this work, I apply classical and contemporary sociological thought and scholarship to the perennial matter of identity and collective action among the socially oppressed. In this study, I also introduce one of the earliest sociological models of betrayal phenomena. I am currently preparing a second edition of this work, which updates the model of betrayal.

Race and EducationMy perspective on the sociology of minority education and the preparation of teachers is seen in another work, the Race and Education Primer (New York: Peter Lang 2008). This primer uses insights from critical pedagogy to provide a thematic introduction to the guiding beliefs and major practices in the field, with a special emphasis on critical, recurring themes. These include race and intelligence, the education gap, teacher education and cultural competence.

My most recent research combines an ongoing interest in the psychosocial and social structural (including media) dynamics underpinning racialized identities and interactions. In America's Atonement: Racial Pain, Recovery Rhetoric, and the Pedagogy of Healing 2nd edition (New York: Peter Lang, 2015), I argue that racial pain is a driving force in contemporary race relations and is especially prevalent in social discourses on identity, fairness, and social justice. Despite its importance, racial pain is too often glossed over as mundane or disingenuous. For this reason, social 

America's Atonementjustice activism and education are in danger of undermining the needs and opportunities to more effectively convey what has been called «difficult knowledge. This book highlights emergent examples of psychic and relational healing.