Dr. Angela  Howell

Associate Professor

 

Dr. Angela Howell

                

Education:
B.A.      Sociology, Morgan State University, 2000
M.A.    Anthropology, Brown University, 2002
Ph.D.    Anthropology, Brown University, 2007

Teaching Interests: Introduction to Anthropology; Introduction to Sociology; Social Problems;  Sociocultural Anthropology; Language and Society; Forensic Anthropology; Introduction to Archaeology; Ethnography of Selected Cultural Regions; Ethnographic Methods; Race, Education and Social Inequality (graduate course); Sociology of Baltimore (graduate course); Urban Sociology (graduate course), *Coordinator Anthropology Concentration

Research Interests: African American identity, youth culture, social constructions of reality, religious expression, race, ethnicity and gender, public anthropology, educational institutions, and literacy

Recent Publications/ Presentations:           

Raised Up Down Yonder: Growing Up Black in Rural Alabama, forthcoming, The University Press of Mississippi, Fall 2013.

"Decolonization Continued: Anthropology and HBCUs" coauthored with Elgin Klugh. July 2013.  Anthropology News. Association of Black Anthropologists News Column.  http://www.anthropology-news.org/?s=anthropology+and+HBCUs&searchsubmit=Search

"Our National Obsession with Toddlers and Tiaras." Anthropology Now. 5(1): 85-92, 2013.

"The Current State of Anthropology at Historically Black Colleges and Universities." Presented at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Montréal, Canada, November 2011.

"One Man, His Message, and His Method: Reclaiming African American Literacy Traditions." Lecture given for the Department of Sociology and Anthropology Lecture Series, Morgan State University, April 2011.

 "Baltimore, The City that Reads?: Vernacular Literacy, Hope, and Fear in America." Presented at the Association of Black Anthropologists/ Society for the Anthropology of North American Conference, Denver, CO, April 2010.

 "President-elect Obama: His Symbolic Importance in His Own Words." Journal of African American Studies 13(2): 187-189, 2009.