Course Offerings

The following courses, offered largely by faculty in the College of Liberal Arts, may be used to satisfy General Education and/or Liberal Arts Core requirements within the College of Liberal Arts:

AFST 350 AFRICANA STUDIES- Three hours; 3 credits. This course takes the Africana studies approach to the study of various aspects of African Diasporic cultures. It focuses on the major developments among, and achievements of, peoples of the African Diaspora in one or more disciplines or areas of study.

AFST 360 AFRICANA STUDIES-- HONORS- Three hours; 3 credits. This course takes the Africana studies approach to the study of various aspects of African Diasporic cultures. It focuses on the major developments among, and achievements of, peoples of the African Diaspora in one or more disciplines or areas of study. Students on university scholarships are required to take this course, rather than AFST 350, to satisfy this General Education requirement.

GENL 201 COMPUTER LITERACY, TECHNOLOGY, SOCIETY AND HUMAN VALUES- Two hours; 2 credits. This course exposes students to the basic components of computing and to the use of computing in daily life. It also examines modern technology and its impact upon society and human values.

GENL 211 COMPUTER LITERACY, TECHNOLOGY, SOCIETY AND HUMAN VALUES--HONORS- Two hours; 2 credits. This course exposes students to the basic components of computing and to the use of computing in daily life. It also examines modern technology and its impact upon society and human values. Students on university scholarships are required to take this course, rather than GENL 201, to satisfy this General Education requirement.

GENL 396  SERVICE LEARNING I-Nine hours; 3 credits.  This course is designed to offer students practical experiences in community organizations as a way to enhance various areas of knowledge and skills learned through the College of Liberal Arts' curriculum. The course differs from a typical internship in that the foundation of service-learning, from which this course is developed, links significant organizational service and core curriculum objectives. Students will select a community organization, which has already identified specific service objectives it needs completed.  Students will engage in meaningful service to agencies and meaningful discussion with classmates from varying disciplines who offer different perspectives of their experiences.

GENL 397 SEMINAR IN THE VISUAL ARTS- Three credits; 3 hours. This course exposes  students to historical developments in the visual arts and the roles which they have played in human civilization. The courses also introduce students to a number of trends and artistic forms in the visual arts as they developed in several cultures around the world.

GENL 398 SEMINAR IN GREAT BOOKS I- Three credits; 3 hours. This course focuses on a limited number of masterpieces of world culture and examines the works as a reflection of the cultures in which they are grounded. This is an interdisciplinary course and looks at the works as a mirror of various aspects of the culture (e.g., history, politics, science and technology, art, aesthetics, literature, sociology, and cultural values). The course may focus on an era, a theme, a trend, a culture, a number of cultures, or another major aspect of civilization, and it seeks to give students a global view through the study of a variety of non-western cultures as well as western culture.

GENL 399 SEMINAR IN GREAT ISSUES OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY I- Three credits; 3 hours. This course focuses on major issues of contemporary society and, through extensive reading, attempts to give students an appreciation for the critical issues of the times, such as environment, science and technology, world hunger, and the arms race. As a part of the university's urban mission, it will deal frequently with issues important to life in the urban community.

GENL 496  SERVICE LEARNING II-Nine hours; 3 credits.  This course is designed to offer students practical experiences in community organizations as a way to enhance various areas of knowledge and skills learned through the College of Liberal Arts' curriculum. The course differs from a typical internship in that the foundation of service-learning, from which this course is developed, links significant organizational service and core curriculum objectives. Students will select a community organization, which has already identified specific service objectives it needs completed.  Students will engage in meaningful service to agencies and meaningful discussion with classmates from varying disciplines who offer different perspectives of their experiences.

GENL 497 SEMINAR IN THE WORLD OF MUSIC-Three credits; 3 hours. This course exposes students to historical developments in music and the roles which they have played in human civilization. The courses also introduce students to a number of trends and artistic forms in music as they developed in several cultures around the world.

GENL 498 SEMINAR IN GREAT BOOKS II-Three credits; 3 hours. This course, like Part I, focuses on a limited number of masterpieces of world culture and examines the works as a reflection of the cultures in which they are grounded. This is an interdisciplinary course and looks at the works as a mirror of various aspects of the culture (e.g., history, politics, science and technology, art, aesthetics, literature, sociology, and cultural values). The course may focus on an era, a theme, a trend, a culture, a number of cultures, or another major aspect of civilization, and it seeks to give students a global view through the study of a variety of non-western cultures as well as western culture.

GENL 499 SEMINAR IN GREAT ISSUES OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY II- Three credits; 3 hours. This course focuses on major issues of contemporary society and, through extensive reading, attempts to give students an appreciation for the critical issues of the times, such as environment, science and technology, world hunger, and the arms race. As a part of the university's urban mission, it will deal frequently with issues important to life in the urban community.

HONR 101 FRESHMAN ORIENTATION FOR HONORS LIBERAL ARTS MAJORS - One hour lecture, one hour lab; 1 credit. This course introduces students to the expectation and demands of higher education, to the legacy and tradition of Morgan State University, to college survival strategies, and to the broad array of career opportunities in liberal arts disciplines. Students enrolled in this class are required to attend all university convocations and other prescribed extracurricular activities for honor students. They are also required to hold conferences with their faculty advisers in order to pass the course. Students transferring 24 or more credits to the university when admitted are exempted from this requirement.

ORIE 101 FRESHMAN ORIENTATION FOR LIBERAL ARTS MAJORS AND UNDECLARED MAJORS- One hour lecture, one hour lab; 1 credit. This course introduces students to the expectation and demands of higher education, to the legacy and tradition of Morgan State University, to college survival strategies, and to the broad array of career opportunities in liberal arts disciplines. Students enrolled in this class are required to attend all university convocations and other prescribed extracurricular activities. They are also required to hold conferences with their faculty advisers in order to pass the course. Students transferring 24 or more credits to the university when admitted are exempted from this requirement.